Walking the circle.

June 1, 2012 § 2 Comments

The European tradition of storytelling is linear—the main character starts somewhere and ends up somewhere completely different. This story-form views life as a tale of change and progress.

Native American stories walk the well-worn path of seasons and cycles that repeat.

I may tell linear stories, but in real life I prefer the native American story-form. Life walks a circle and I like it that way.

Take vegetable gardens. They happen every year—twice for the dedicated gardener, winter and summer.

I am now at the hopeful beginning of the summer garden season, a season that has risen again and again over the horizon of the year for me, and for my father, putting in Jersey tomatoes in Princeton Junction, and for my grandfather, thumbing pea seeds into the ground in Congers, New York.

« Read the rest of this entry »

My own back yard.

April 14, 2011 § 18 Comments

Peppers in the summer garden, 2010.

I wonder each week as I sit down to write a post for this blog, have I emptied the cupboard?

Is everything I know and feel already out there in black and white?

But week after week, like Dorothy Gale, I discover that to find what I’m searching for I need look no further than my own backyard.

When given more than a passing glance, the things I take for granted turn out to be the substance of my life, and far more nourishing than the wishful dreams my brain invents.

« Read the rest of this entry »

In defense of weeds.

September 28, 2010 § 4 Comments

The word “weed” is like any  label we use when we throw a lot of different things into one big pile, toss a tarp over it and say, “We don’t need any of that.

We call people we don’t like lowlifes, deadbeats, trash; places we don’t like slums.  And we call plants we don’t like weeds.  There is no biology to back up the term, just a judgment call.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Cheating the season.

September 13, 2010 § 1 Comment

It’s been the hottest summer I can remember.  Tomatoes, cucumbers, squash—one by one the plants went down. Except for the peppers, by early August our summer garden had succumbed to the heat. 

It’s mid-September now.  Mornings are almost cool.  It’s time to put in the winter garden.  But as a gardener, I have two traits in common with gamblers, I hope against reason, and I believe in luck, so a couple of weeks ago I spread my hand of seed packets on the table and pulled out the summer squash varieties that had the shortest time from germination to harvest, those promising squash in 5O days or less.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Gardening category at Adrian Fogelin.